Tag: Unions

Canada

“We Won!”: University Professors Strike in Québec City

This February, thirteen-hundred faculty members walked off the job at Québec City’s Université Laval for nearly five weeks, winning a number of concessions from the university including pay raises and improvements to faculty workloads. Rhiannon Maton interviews Nat Nesvaderani about life on the picket line and the lessons learned for future struggles.

Blue tractor trailer with Amazon Prime logo crosses a bridge over water.
Amazon

Turnover Time

Kim Moody explains how the extreme optimization of Amazon’s logistics systems, which keep goods (and therefore, capital) in constant motion, produces massive profits for the company while rendering it distinctively vulnerable to workers’ intervention. As technologically advanced as it is, Amazon still relies on human labor at every point in production; as its logistics networks become increasingly complicated, the points at which production can be slowed or stopped by organized labor continue to multiply.

Class struggle

Notes on America’s Railroads

Guy Miller explains the roots of Congressional strike breaking in the railroad industry.

Photograph of a large, modern train station in England.
Class struggle

Tories Collapse Amidst a Growing Strike Wave

Raymond Morell writes about the latest wave of strikes across the UK in the face of an inflation and cost-of-living crisis, and analyzes the strengths and challenges facing the burgeoning movement.

Anti-capitalism

The Limits of White Skin Privilege

Michael Goldfield reflects on his time in the Sojourner Truth Organization to develop a critique of Noel Ignatiev’s theory of white skin privilege.

Chicanx politics

Farah’s 50 Years Later

Fifty years ago, thousands of garment workers along the U.S.-Mexico border launched a two-year strike and boycott at Farah Manufacturing. Gabriel Solis draws lessons from their struggle for social movements on the border today.

Anti-capitalism

Payback Time

Kim Moody argues that the current economic conjuncture is among the most favorable for workers in decades. But might we see the organized militancy required to bring about better working conditions, wages, and contracts?

HELLO, COMRADE

While logged in, you may access all print issues.

If you’d like to log out, click here:

NEED TO UPDATE YOUR DETAILS?

Support our Work

Gift Subscriptions, Renewals, and More